Gloria’s Quilt
Gloria’s Quilt
Gloria’s Quilt
Gloria’s Quilt
Gloria’s Quilt

Being a part of a long family history of talented and inspired craftswomen has prompted me to analyze the evolution of craft from a domestic practice into a higher form of feminist art. During this project I looked at traditional needlework and explored circular forms, which represent connectivity through generations and create a sacred space for art making. The main distinction between craft and fine art is that craft was performed in a domestic environment to create objects for the household. The transformation to fine art was defined by craft moving into the public sphere, wherein women were creating works of art that surpassed the anonymity of domestic craft and could be involved in the spectatorship of the art community. The alternative craft movement has brought craft back into the public sphere by using traditional craft techniques to make social and political statements.

This piece was constructed for the spring semester these project on The Evolution of Craft in Feminist Art. The quilt was modeled after a baby blanket that my great-great-grandmother Carolyn made for my grandmother Gloria in the 1920’s. In order to pay homage to the women in my family who have passed down their knowledge of crafts to me, I followed the pattern of the quilt while using unconventional materials associated with fiber arts and needlework. These materials surpass the function of a quilt while highlighting the detailed craft that goes into such a piece of art.

Scripps College
BFA Honors Thesis, Lucia Suffel Arts and Crafts Award Winner



Gloria’s Quilt

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